6 Herbal Teas Guaranteed to Quickly Clear Blemishes

YOUR EXISTING AD GOES HERE

Disclosure: My blog contains affiliate links, which means I receive a tiny commission from qualifying purchases. I link to these companies and products due to quality, regardless of whether or not you buy.

YOUR EXISTING AD GOES HERE

Zits and blemishes are a harsh reality we all deal with at some point in life.

You might head to the drug store or scour the internet to find ways to help clear your skin. Miracle products you see will claim to stop pimples in their tracks, and the wishful thinker that you are, you probably buy these over-the-counter cure-alls.

But did you know you can use herbal tea to clear your skin much better than store-bought products? You could even grow your favorite herbal cures at home, where they’re forever on hand when you need them.

Herbal Tea vs Store-Bought Skincare Products

Photo via Noah Buscher on  UnsplashPhoto via Noah Buscher on Unsplash

Herbal teas are a quick and easy way to create an at-home cure yourself, without learning a complicated process or spending a ton of cash on skin care products.

Tea is a natural and easy way to deliver health benefits directly into your body. People around the world have been drinking herbal teas since as early as 2700 BC.  It’s one of the oldest forms of medicine for so many different uses.

Thanks to the healing powers the tasty treat offers, herbal tea can also aid various skin ailments. From chronic skin conditions like eczema to blemishes, acne, and scaring.

The best part about tea is that it’s simple to make at home. Just whip up a batch whenever you need it.

Herbal teas are well-known to:

  • improve the complexion of your skin

  • fight acne and blemishes

  • remove puffiness under the eyes

  • aid signs of aging, like elasticity and wrinkles

Store-bought skin care products, on the other hand, are infamous for containing dangerous chemicals and other toxins. These ingredients mold into your skin, making the problem much worse over time.

Think about it: Have you ever bought a zit-zapper only to wind up with much worse looking skin after you use the product? Next thing you know you’re buying another skincare product to combat the issues (like dryness, ugh) the last one caused. The process never ends!

Herbal teas are much safer. However, you do still need to know which tea is best for you. You may want to select the herbal tea you make based on your:

  • Age: Some options may not be safe for children, the elderly, or people with certain health conditions.

  • Ailment: Various herbal teas come with different purposes. Even the same herbs used for acne can offer other uses. You can also use them in varying ways. You want to consider your specific needs. Acne and Eczema, for example, are hugely different conditions with opposing causes and triggers.

  • Allergies: If you have any serious allergies, you may want to proceed with caution. Make sure the herbal remedy you select won’t cause you more harm.

What are Blemishes? How Are They Different From Acne?

Photo via Scott Webb on  UnsplashPhoto via Scott Webb on Unsplash

There are many names for varying skin concerns and different types of acne. Knowing the difference between blemishes and acne is important because you must understand the ailment you’re trying to treat with herbal tea if it’s ever going to work. You also need to know what type of acne you may have.

Acne and skin blemishes are most common among teenagers but affect people of all ages.

Blemishes are any type of mark or flaw on your skin, including your face and body. They’re not life-threatening. However, some blemishes may signal skin cancer.

Just because you have a blemish doesn’t mean you have cancer or acne either. A blemish can include a spot, discoloration, blackheads, whitehead, pimple, or cyst. Any mark in the skin counts as a blemish.

The word blemish and acne are often used interchangeably to describe acne. Acne, however, is a skin condition. It refers to the appearance of blemishes or a group of small and inflamed bumps on your skin’s surface. The marks can appear on the face, chest, upper back, and shoulders.

It gets confusing because acne blemishes commonly include:

  • Blackheads and whiteheads: Black and white marks that show when your pores are clogged with dead skin cells, oil (sebum), or bacteria. These are considered non-inflammatory acne because they don’t cause swelling.

  • Papules: Aka pimples. Papules cause inflammation and form from dead skin cells, bacteria, and oil deep in the skin.

  • Pustules: Pus-filled bumps similar to papules, but with a yellow or white fluid inside.

  • Acne nodules and cysts: Larger than regular pimples, this type of blemish penetrates much deeper in the skin and can cause acne scars after healing. Cystic acne is often the largest, most painful, and most likely to scar.

How you treat your skin condition depends on the cause. You may, for example, produce too much sebum oil that results in blackheads. Some types of acne blemishes are inflammatory while others are not as well, so you wouldn’t treat blackheads and cystic acne the same way.

If your condition is severe, you may need to see a dermatologist to help clear up your acne.

6 Herbal Teas Guaranteed to Quickly Clear Blemishes

Photo via Lisa Hobbs on  UnsplashPhoto via Lisa Hobbs on Unsplash

Skip the drugstore skincare products in favor of a healthier alternative. Here are the six best herbal teas that are guaranteed to quickly clear blemishes. These herbal tea remedies provide the glowing skin you deserve:

1. Echinacea (Coneflower)

Photo via StockSnap

Photo via StockSnap

If you have psoriasis or eczema, you may already know about the healing powers of echinacea when it comes to skincare. However, it can also be used to treat acne problems and is often even used to create skin creams. Because echinacea contains tannins that shrink skin cells, it also makes a great anti-wrinkle cure.

Drink echinacea herbal tea when you’re experiencing painful breakouts or think you may soon face a breakout. Echinacea aka Coneflower contains anti-inflammatory properties that help reduce the appearance of red, painful acne. Studies even prove the herbal tea even stops the inflammation from bacteria-causing acne before it shows.

Pro Tip: Purple coneflowers are hardy in USDA zones 3 to 9, but can be planted indoors in colder regions. All parts of the plant are edible, but the flower buds and leaves are the most ideal to harvest for herbal tea.

2. Green Tea

Photo via Stock Snap

Photo via Stock Snap

Green tea is good for maintaining a healthy glow, as it reduces inflammation and redness. This type of herbal tea boosts skin health and cell production. It can also help protect against harmful sun damage, which keeps the skin looking younger longer and protects against wrinkle formation.

When it comes to blemishes, green tea truly shines. Research shows that green tea is rich in epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), which is a polyphenol ideal to improve acne in people with oily skin. Excess sebum (oil) clogs pores and increases bacterial growth, so the EGCG in green tea breaks the cycle before hormonal acne attacks.

Pro Tip: After you steep a bag of green tea in hot water, try using the tea bag to create a mixture for your face. Mix the leftover green tea leaves with honey and apply the combination to your clean face for around 20 minutes. Rinse the mask off with cool water. Pat dry.

3. Dandelion

Photo by Azmi Semih OKAY on Unsplash

Photo by Azmi Semih OKAY on Unsplash

If you have sensitive skin or burn in the sun easily, this is the herbal remedy for you!

Not just a weed, this plant makes an excellent tea that is great for your internal organs as well. The antioxidants and immune-boosting ingredients help your skin stay young and appear fresh, and dandelion tea will even help digestion issues that may cause your blemishes.

Dandelion root works so well because it’s a detoxifier. It treats liver problems and keeps toxins from getting into any skin-inflaming acne you already have. Use this herbal tea for hormonal acne or to reduce hyperpigmentation in your skin.

Pro Tip: Harvest young greens and unopened dandelion flowers in the spring. The roots are best harvested in the fall for a less bitter taste. You can harvest in the summer if you want, but the plant offers less medicinal qualities. Lift the dandelion from the ground with the root intact, cut the leaves from the base of the root, and wash and dry the plant for herbal tea.

4. Peppermint

Photo by Rob Sarmiento on Unsplash

Photo by Rob Sarmiento on Unsplash

Peppermint tea is popular in skincare because it contains menthol, which is great for those who are prone to breakouts or those with oily skin. This tea can also brighten up dull skin and can even be used to soothe dry or itchy skin.

Peppermint has astringent, anti-inflammatory, and antiseptic properties. It diminishes the appearance of red blemishes. Use it to fight acne as well as blackheads and whiteheads. A daily cup of peppermint tea can rejuvenate your skin and clear your pores.

Caution: Peppermint (and even peppermint essential oil) isn’t recommended for children. According to the National Association for Holistic Aromatherapy (NAHA), you should also avoid peppermint if you have severe liver damage, gallbladder disease, gallstones, or chronic heartburn.

Pro Tip: Peppermint is super easy to grow in an indoor herb garden. You can drink peppermint tea to reap the benefits, or use peppermint essential oil to create your own natural peppermint toners and cleaners.

5. Chamomile

Photo by Maria Shanina on UnsplashPhoto by Maria Shanina on Unsplash

Photo by Maria Shanina on Unsplash

Chamomile is a popular herbal tea option for many different reasons, from calming you to reducing the eye puffiness, dark circles, redness and inflammation that comes with acne. It reduces stress, aids the sleep needed for your skin to heal, and can even help protect your skin against harmful UV rays from the sun.

Overall, studies show chamomile is a powerful herbal medicine.

Grab this option when your acne acts up. Drinking chamomile tea can reduce the severity of your breakout. If you have dry skin, keep in mind that chamomile tea may dry out your skin a bit. You’ll want to apply a moisturizer afterward for the best results.

Pro Tip: Apply the herbal tea directly onto your skin to reduce skin inflammation and clear acne symptoms overnight. Rub chamomile tea onto your face to reduce acne scars as well.

6. Rose

Photo by Marco Secchi on Unsplash

Photo by Marco Secchi on Unsplash

The symbol of love, drinking tea made from these gorgeous flowers can help you practice self-love and care for your skin at the same time.

Rose herbal tea is ideal for various skin problems, including acne. It clears the skin, reduces blemishes with anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant properties, and packs in vitamins great for hydrating and tightening the skin. You can even wash your face using rose tea if you need extra hydration or add rose tea around your eyes to relieve puffiness, redness, or rash when allergy season strikes!

All roses are edible. Use the fragrant petals from well-known edible roses for the best taste. Varieties to try eating include Hybrid Tea roses or David Austin roses like:

  • R.moyesii ‘Alba’

  • R. Rugosa ‘Blanc Double de Coubert’

  • ‘Generous Gardener’

  • ‘Lady Shallot’

  • ‘Golden Celebration’

  • ‘Teasing Georgia’

  • ‘Graham Thomas’

  • ‘Jubilee Celebration’

  • ‘Crown Princess Margareta’

  • ‘Elegant Lady’

Pro Tip: Pick young leaves for the best flavor, plucking the unopened buds and leaves from the plant with your fingers. Allow the rosebuds and leaves to dry indoors for around a month and store the extra in jars for future use.

How to Drink More Herbal Tea: Add a Cup to Your Morning Routine

Photo by  Massimo Adami  on  Unsplash

Photo by Massimo Adami on Unsplash

In my experience, the easiest possible way to start drinking more herbal tea is to add a cup to your routine. Choose either your morning or evening routine, and settle down with a steaming mug filled with one of these six options.

I already have a morning routine in motion where I drink coffee while I read, so It’s easy for me to substitute herbal tea for the coffee. Both are hot, delicious beverages.

I’ve found it much easier to switch out my morning coffee for a cup of herbal tea first thing in the morning. I might not always do so because I’m a huge coffee fan, but I try to make sure I sub out herbal tea for coffee at least one day per week.

Typically I up the number if I notice my skin is having trouble, I know I have eaten like crap, or PMS time is upon me. The trick here is knowing your skin’s habits.

That said, you don’t have to drink herbal tea

I also love the idea of treating yourself to a hot beverage while you take care of your skin’s health, relax and recharge, and get some self-care out of the way at the same time. Sometimes I’ll take a bubble bath with a mug of tea or sit back in my comfy chair with a face mask on.

Why does this work? Studies show it’s much easier to create a new habit by incorporating a habit you already have in place. And what better habit do we all have than our morning and bedtime routines?!

Bonus Tip: Grow Your Own Herbs Too

Photo via Allie Dearie on  Unsplash

Photo via Allie Dearie on Unsplash

For an added bonus, you could grow the herbs you need for your favorite tea at home. There are so many reasons you should grow an herb garden, as I point out in my previous post 9 Main Reasons Why You Need to Grow an Herb Garden.

To get started, you’ll need seeds. I recommend buying local if you can, but you should be able to find all your needs online.”Seeds Now” company is my favorite online companie.

You’ll also need a drying rack and a shady, dry location where the plants can sit for a while.

Do you love herbal tea? What are your favorites? Do you grow the plants and cultivate them at home already? Share your home remedies for gorgeous skin or favorite herbal recipes in the comments below.

YOUR EXISTING AD GOES HERE
>